As a motorist, no one in Washington or any other state across the nation believes that he or she will be involved in an accident. Thus, it is shocking when they are involved in a collision that causes them and their children passengers to be harmed in the wreck. While adults are susceptible to all types of injuries in a crash, children are more prone to severe injuries, such as a brain injury, when an automobile crash occurs.

Based on current research, children take much longer to recover from brain injuries when compared to adults with similar head trauma. Brain scans may be the answer to understand why this is the case. Brain imaging illustrates that damage to the white matter in the brain might be associated with a slower recovery from the injury.

According to statistics, a traumatic brain injury or a TBI is the leading cause of disability in children. However, when a TBI is the culprit, it is difficult to predict the long-term outcomes and which children might require a more aggressive treatment approach.

While the severity of the injury certainly plays a role, uncertainty remains as researchers seek to assess and understand the ability to rehabilitate children following a serious TBI. When considering the data of a study that involved 21 children who have suffered a TBI in a car accident, pedestrian crash or a fall, the rate of recovery had one clear trend. Those on a slower path to recovery suffered disruptions to the white matter in their brain. It was also found that these children suffered issues related to thinking and memory skills.

No matter your age or the severity of the brain injury, it is important to consider the incident as a whole. This means not only considering the immediate damages suffered because of the injury suffered in a car accident but also the future losses associated with the care and treatment of the injury. Those seeking to recover damages through a personal injury action should understand their situation and how best to proceed with an action so his or her rights are protected.

Source: U.S. News, “Why Some Kids Take Longer to Recover From Brain Injury,” Robert Preidt, March 15, 2017