When many people think of a motorcycle crash, they imagine a bike speeding along the highway out of control only to be upended by any number of fateful circumstances. Such accidents often result in serious injury or death. But the truth is there are many motorcyclists who obey the speed limit, don’t drink and drive and wear protective gear. And unfortunately, they sometimes get hurt by the negligence of other motorists. On October 10, a 50-year-old man on his motorcycle was seriously injured in downtown Seattle, at the intersection of Third Avenue and Pike Street.

The motorcyclist was stopped at a traffic light on Pike Street; just before 2:30 p.m. The “Ride the Duck” amphibious tourist vehicle (duck boat) pulled up behind the rider. Suddenly, the duck boat lurched forward towards the bike, while the motorcycle driver was stationary waiting for the light to turn green. As a result, he was dragged under the vehicle and became “entangled” underneath it. He was dragged for approximately 20 feet. The man was rushed to Harborview Medical Center in serious condition, which was later upgraded to satisfactory. No further word on his injuries was immediately available after the motorcycle injury.

Police are continuing to investigate the accident and acknowledge that the cyclist was wearing a helmet. While the first thought is for his full recovery from his serious injury, it appears clear he has a legal basis for a personal injury claim against the driver and owner of the duck boat. He would surely benefit from consulting a Seattle personal injury attorney experienced. The lawyer may help assess liability, preserve important evidence and pursue a claim for financial remuneration for the man’s personal injuries as well any pain and suffering. The law provides for the right of a seriously injured person to recover monetary damages from all negligent parties contributing to or causing an accident and a lawyer can help achieve optimal results.

Source: New York Injury News, “Seattle motorcyclist injured in crash with ride the duck vehicle,” Oct. 14, 2011