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Motorcyclist injured by suspected drunk driver

Despite the cooler winter temperatures, many people are still enjoying their motorcycles in Washington. These vehicles provide quick and cheap transportation for many citizens. However, motorcycles and their riders are often not given proper respect on the roadways -- no matter what time of year they are riding. In many cases, drivers do not look for or yield to motorcyclists' right of way. This can cause dangerous motorcycle accidents that have devastating effects for riders.

Recently, a Washington motorcyclist was injured after the 51-year-old man was hit by a suspected drunk driver. In this case, the motorcyclist was riding in an intersection when he was hit by a 54-year-old driver in a 1986 Isuzu pickup truck. Police say that the driver of the pickup truck failed to stop at the controlled intersection before hitting the motorcycle. The driver was not hurt in the accident, but was arrested and taken to a local jail. The motorcyclist was taken to a local hospital and listed in satisfactory condition.

While the media may like to portray motorcyclists as tough, law breaking gangsters, many people who ride motorcycles around Washington are just looking to get from one point to another. They are on their way home, work or school. They deserve the same respect as any other driver on the road.

When motorcyclists are injured, they should know they have legal rights. If the other driver failed to yield, was distracted or drunk, then that driver can be held responsible for the damage caused. A legal suit cannot take away the physical pain from the accident, however, it can ease the financial burden the accident caused. A personal injury suit can include damages for lost wages, medical expenses and other costs caused by the accident.

Source: South Whidbey Record, "Freeland crash sends one to hospital, one to jail," Jan. 19, 2014

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