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Pedestrian accidents a real risk on Halloween

As Seattle parents gear up to take their kids out trick-or-treating, adults may also want to consider using Halloween festivities as an opportunity to remind children about the importance of traffic safety. Although the number of children involved in pedestrian accidents increases only slightly on Halloween, the fact remains that children were killed or injured in at least six cities last year.

As one might expect, the majority of accidents have involved children walking along a roadway or crossing the street. Drunk drivers may be more of a concern than usual, given the festive atmosphere associated with Halloween. Likewise, costumes on parade and the lure of holiday decorations may increase the potential for accidents caused by a distracted driver.

Because children often trick-or-treat in groups or with parents, pedestrian accidents on Halloween pose the risk of injury to more than one victim. At least one accident last Halloween injured the parents and the child.

It's already quite clear that getting hit by a car can result in catastrophic injuries. When a driver's negligence causes injuries to a child, the entire course of the victim's life can be altered, requiring long-term care and medical expenses.

Washington parents of a child injured by another person's negligence should know that they may be entitled to compensation that can help provide for the child's future care and needs. An experienced personal injury attorney can help make certain that a negligent driver's insurance company does not take advantage of a family's fear and vulnerability in the wake of a traumatic accident. This sort of scenario plays out all-too-often, but there are ways of ensuring that parents are fairly compensated for their personal losses and medical expenses.

Source: WBAY, "Halloween risks: Cars, sports (not tainted candy)," Beth J. Harpaz, Oct. 16, 2012

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