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Seattle area driver flees after striking motorcyclist

Some of the most difficult motor vehicle accident cases are those that involve a hit-and-run driver. Not only are there challenges when it comes to evidence, but it also makes an unfortunate event all the more disturbing when a driver makes the choice to run from responsibility.

Just Tuesday evening in Anacortes, Washington, a driver who struck a motorcyclist did not have the courage to stop at the scene and call 911, but rather she drove a bit further and called a tow truck for her own vehicle.

The motorcyclist had been struck from behind by the woman who then drove away, and after falling off of his motorcycle he was struck by another car, whose driver did stop. The 23-year-old motorcycle driver died the following morning at a Seattle hospital.

A license plate from the hit-and-run driver's vehicle fell off at the scene of the accident, and police used it to track the driver down. She told them that she fled because she was too scared to stop.

When police catch hit-and-run drivers, they sometimes do not have insurance and that is the reason that they fled. However, in those cases it is possible for victims or their surviving loved ones to recover compensation from their own insurance policies, however, insurance companies do not always pay up without a fight.

When it comes to hit-and-run accidents, victims and their survivors have a long road ahead of them whether police find the driver or not. It is important that these victims have advocates.

Source: Seattle Times, "Driver calls for tow but not 911 after fatal crash in Anacortes," John de Leon, Aug. 22, 2012

1 Comment

Drivers fleeing the scene of a car accident is terrible at the best of times especially when there is a motorcyclist involved. Road users should be more considerate of motorbike riders who are particularly vulnerable. I hope the offending driver is caught!

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