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3-year-old boy killed in car accident in eastern Washington state

Here in Seattle, parents and other citizens alike are often responsible to protect the children in our communities. Unfortunately, innocent children do sometimes become victims of the negligent or reckless behavior of adults.

This past Saturday, a 3-year-old boy was killed after he ran into the street and was struck by an SUV in Mabton, Washington. Although it is known that the boy ran into the street, the police are still investigating the exact cause of this tragic accident.

Even when curious children run into the street or other dangerous areas, this does not necessarily mean that any accidents that ensue are their own fault. Often, when cars strike pedestrians the cars were driving too fast, or the driver was distracted or went through a traffic light or stop sign.

In many cases, even when a child unexpectedly darts into the street, drivers are able to stop their vehicles in time because they are paying attention to the road.

Of course, we do not yet know enough about this case to speculate.

However, it is important that parents of children who are injured or killed in car accidents know that they can hold wrongdoers accountable. Sometimes, this might be a driver, and in other situations it may be the child's caregiver at the time of an accident, or city or county authorities for not maintaining fences, streets or traffic lights.

By holding negligent parties accountable, parents can receive compensation for funeral or medical expenses and pain and suffering, and perhaps more importantly, help prevent another family from suffering the same fate.

Source: Seattle Times, "Boy, 3, dies in Yakima-area car accident," July 29, 2012

  • Our firm handles similar situations to the one discussed in this post. If you would like to learn more about our practice, please visit our Seattle Child Injury page.

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